Dying at home of Covid-19 : Meeting the need for home-based care

Copyright © 2021 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved..

Despite the increased burden of Covid-19 on older adults, ethical and public health frameworks lack adequate guidance for elderly patients who manage severe, even fatal, illness at home. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO) recognize the heightened risks of Covid-19 for older adults; however, both organizations presuppose that most cases of Covid-19 will be mild to moderate and recoverable at home. Yet, older adults are least likely to follow this trajectory. Older patients are more susceptible to experiencing severe illness at home from which they may not recover; and if they do seek medical care, they tend to suffer worse outcomes than younger patients in intensive care settings. Given their likelihood of severe illness, worse outcomes in intensive care settings, and potential difficulty accessing resources, frail, disabled, and otherwise vulnerable older patients may face Covid-19 at home without adequate resources, information, or support for home-based care. This editorial proposes three approaches to prevent needless suffering and ensure that this vulnerable population continues to receive needed care.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Preventive medicine - Vol. 145 (2021), p. 106409

Language:

English

Contributors:

Fallon, Cara Kiernan
Kilbride, Madison K

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

*Guidelines as Topic
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
COVID-19
Disabled Persons
Editorial
Female
Health care policy
Home Care Services
Home Nursing
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Older adults
Public health
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
SARS-CoV-2
United States
Vulnerable Populations

Notes:

Date Completed 05.04.2021

Date Revised 05.04.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1016/j.ypmed.2020.106409

PMID:

33388327

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM320540537