Emergency response to COVID-19 epidemic : One Chinese blood centre's experience

© 2020 British Blood Transfusion Society..

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 epidemic has caused a significant global social and economic impact since December 2019. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the emergency response of a Chinese blood centre on maintaining both the safety and the sufficiency of blood supply during large, emerging, infectious epidemics.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Early on in the outbreak of COVID-19, the Chengdu Blood Center developed strategies and implemented a series of measures, including enhanced recruitment efforts, addition of new donation deferral criteria and notification after donation, optimisation of donor experience, development and implementation of a new coronavirus nucleic acid detection technology platform for blood screening and screening all donations for SARS-CoV-2 RNA to maximumly protect the safety of blood supply during a time of unclear risk.

RESULTS: Starting on February 20, the immediate satisfaction rate of blood product orders in Chengdu city's clinical settings reached 100%, and there was no case of blood transfusion infection.

CONCLUSION: The recent experience during the outbreak of SARS-CoV-2 reminded us that improvement in the areas of national and international collaborative programmes for dealing with blood availability and safety concerns during early stages of a disaster and regional and national mechanisms for timely communication with the general public on behalf of blood services should help to better prepare us for future disasters.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Transfusion medicine (Oxford, England) - Vol. 31, No. 3 (2021), p. 155-159

Language:

English

Contributors:

Hu, Ping
Kang, Jianxun
Li, Ying
Li, Xiaochun
Li, Meng
Deng, Min
Zhao, Yuwei
Tian, Hao
Li, Rui
Zhang, Jie
Xi, Yan
Li, Wen
Gao, Jialiang
Shan, Hua
Fu, Xuemei

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

Blood center
COVID-19
Emergency response
Journal Article

Notes:

Date Revised 11.06.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status In-Process

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1111/tme.12719

PMID:

33000534

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM316675164