Drugs intervention study in COVID-19 management

© 2021 Walter de Gruyter GmbH, Berlin/Boston..

By 9 February 2021, the Coronavirus has killed 2,336,650 people worldwide and it has been predicted that this number continues to increase in year 2021. The study aimed to identify therapeutic approaches and drugs that can potentially be used as interventions in Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) management. A systematic scoping review was conducted. Articles reporting clinical evidence of therapeutic management of COVID-19 were selected from three different research databases (Google Scholar, PubMed, and Science Direct). From the database search, 31 articles were selected based on the study inclusion and exclusion criteria. This review paper showed that remdesivir and ivermectin significantly reduced viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) activity. On the other hand, convalescent plasma (CP) significantly improved COVID-19 clinical symptoms. Additionally, the use of corticosteroid increased survival rates in COVID-19 patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Findings also indicated that both hydroxychloroquine and favipiravir were effective against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, lopinavir-ritonavir combination was not effective against COVID-19. Finally, ribavirin, galidesivir, and sofosbuvir showed potential therapeutic benefit in treating COVID-19, but there is a lack of clinical evidence on their effectiveness against SARS-CoV-2. Remdesivir, ivermectin, favipiravir, hydroxychloroquine, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, and CP are the therapeutic agents that can potentially be used in COVID-19 management.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Drug metabolism and personalized therapy - (05.04.2021)

Language:

English

Contributors:

Taher, Muhammad
Tik, Noratika
Susanti, Deny

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

Antiviral
COVID-19
Clinical trial
Drug intervention
Journal Article
Review
SARS-CoV-2

Notes:

Date Revised 05.04.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status Publisher

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1515/dmdi-2020-0173

PMID:

33818031

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM324826265