Older Adults' Risk Perception during the COVID-19 Pandemic in Lombardy Region of Italy : A Cross-sectional Survey

During COVID-19 pandemic, older adults are the segment of the population at higher health risk. Given the important role the risk perception has in influencing both the behaviors and psychological well-being, it appears useful exploring this factor in this segment of the population. Despite different studies already described the factors influencing the risk perception, few focused on older adults. For this reason, we investigated risk perception in 514 people over 60 years during the lockdown. We administered a structured interview collecting socio-demographic information, sources of information used, actions undertaken to avoid contagion, and risk perception. Risk perception related to COVID-19 was significantly lower than the perceived risk associated with other threats, and it was correlated to the number of sources of information used but not to the actions undertaken. Furthermore, we found higher risk perception in who knew infected persons, and a negative correlation between the risk perception and age, with the over 75 perceiving a lower risk of getting infected compared to the younger participants. Our results should be taken as informative for future studies. Indeed, further studies on the older adults and the risk perception during emergencies are needed to better orient both communication and supporting strategies.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Journal of gerontological social work - Vol. 64, No. 6 (2021), p. 585-598

Language:

English

Contributors:

Guastafierro, Erika
Toppo, Claudia
Magnani, Francesca G
Romano, Rosa
Facchini, Carla
Campioni, Rino
Brambilla, Ersilia
Leonardi, Matilde

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

Aging
COVID-19
Journal Article
Older adults
Risk perception
SARS-CoV-2

Notes:

Date Revised 14.07.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status In-Process

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1080/01634372.2020.1870606

PMID:

33393447

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM320591743