A comprehensive review on sarilumab in COVID-19

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, caused by a newly discovered coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, or SARS-CoV-2), continues to spread all around the world. Despite the emergency of COVID-19 worldwide, remdesivir is the only treatment that has been recently approved to treat the diseases, and other effective therapies are still lacking. SARS-CoV-2 may cause severe illness in 20% of patients. Based on available data, there is an association between interleukin-6 (IL-6) and severe COVID-19. Sarilumab is a fully human immunoglobulin G1 monoclonal antibody binding to both membrane-bound and soluble IL-6 receptors with high affinity and has been considered for off-label use in the treatment of COVID-19.Areas covered: The present article reviews recently published literature focusing on the pathophysiology of COVID-19 induced cytokine storm, the potential therapeutic role, and important clinical issues of sarilumab in the treatment of COVID-19 patients.Expert opinion: The off-label treatment administration is unavoidable in the critical situation of the COVID-19 pandemic. Further efforts should be directed to determine mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 induced immune dysregulation as well as indications of sarilumab in the patients with COVID-19 to minimize concerns regarding its off-label administration.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Expert opinion on biological therapy - Vol. 21, No. 5 (2021), p. 615-626

Language:

English

Contributors:

Khiali, Sajad
Rezagholizadeh, Afra
Entezari-Maleki, Taher

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

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415SHH325A
Adenosine Monophosphate
Alanine
Animals
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized
Antiviral Agents
COVID-19
Cytokine Release Syndrome
Cytokine release syndrome
End-organ damage
Humans
IL-6
Journal Article
Multi-organ damage
NU90V55F8I
OF5P57N2ZX
Pandemics
Remdesivir
Review
SARS-CoV-2
Sarilumab

Notes:

Date Completed 17.05.2021

Date Revised 17.05.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1080/14712598.2021.1847269

PMID:

33161757

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM318282623