Stockpiling in the time of COVID-19

© 2020 The British Psychological Society..

OBJECTIVES: Consistent with behaviour observed in prior crises, individuals are stockpiling supplies during the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The goal of this study was to describe stockpiling behaviour in response to COVID-19 and investigate individual predictors of stockpiling.

METHODS: Workers (N = 363, 54.72% male, 44.65% female, 0.63% other; Mage  = 38.41, SD = 12.48, range = 18-78) were recruited from Amazon's Mechanical Turk and completed a survey about their stockpiling of 13 items, as well as behaviours and opinions surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic and their political affiliation.

RESULTS: Participants stockpiled, on average, approximately 6 items, and toilet paper was the item most commonly procured. Approximately 25% of the sample acquired a gun or other weapon in response to the pandemic and approximately 20% of participants stockpiled gold or other precious metals. Stockpiling was more commonly observed among individuals who were more conservative, worried more about the pandemic, and social distanced less.

CONCLUSIONS: Individual, societal, and ideological implications are discussed.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

British journal of health psychology - Vol. 26, No. 2 (2021), p. 535-543

Language:

English

Contributors:

Micalizzi, Lauren
Zambrotta, Nicholas S
Bernstein, Michael H

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

*COVID-19
*Pandemics
Adult
Anxiety
Attitude
COVID-19
Coronavirus
Female
Hoarding
Humans
Journal Article
Male
Pandemic
Panic buying
Public health emergency
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
SARS-CoV-2
Stockpiling

Notes:

Date Completed 23.04.2021

Date Revised 02.05.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1111/bjhp.12480

PMID:

33080090

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM317469010