Why do children seem to be more protected against COVID-19? A hypothesis

Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved..

Today it remains unclear why children seem to be less likely to get infected by COVID-19 or why they appear to be less symptomatic after infections. All individuals, especially children, are exposed to various viruses including human coronavirus (CoVs) that can generally lead to respiratory infections. We hypothesize that recurrent CoVs exposure may induce an effective antiviral B and T-cell-mediated adaptive immune response, which could also be protective against COVID-19. Based on the high-homology between the Spike protein epitopes of taxonomically-related coronaviruses, we theorize that past/recurrent contact with CoVs might shield children also against the circulating COVID-19 through a possible neutralizing antibody response previously CoVs-induced. This would open up possible lines of research for the development of live-attenuated virus vaccines from CoVs. Future research is desirable to confirm or disprove such hypothesis.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2020

Contained In:

Medical hypotheses - Vol. 143 (2020), p. 110151

Language:

English

Contributors:

Sposato, Bruno
Scalese, Marco

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

*Betacoronavirus
*Immunologic Memory
*Models, Immunological
*Pandemics
Adult
Age Distribution
Angiotensin converting enzyme 2
Antibodies, Neutralizing
Antibodies, Viral
Antigens, Viral
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
COVID-19
COVID-19 vaccine
Child
Children
Comparative Study
Coronavirus
Coronavirus Infections
Cross Reactions
Disease Resistance
EC 3.4.15.1
EC 3.4.17.-
Epitopes
Humans
Infection
Journal Article
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A
Pneumonia, Viral
Pulmonary Alveoli
Receptors, Virus
Respiratory Tract Infections
Sequence Homology, Amino Acid
Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
Spike protein, SARS-CoV-2
Vaccines, Attenuated
Viral Vaccines

Notes:

Date Completed 13.10.2020

Date Revised 13.10.2020

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1016/j.mehy.2020.110151

PMID:

32763661

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM314317732