Risk to health from COVID-19 for anaesthetists and intensivists - a narrative review

© 2020 The Association of Anaesthetists..

Healthcare workers are at an increased risk of infection, harm and death from COVID-19. Close and prolonged exposure to individuals infectious with SARS-CoV-2 leads to infection. A person's individual characteristics (age, sex, ethnicity and comorbidities) then influence the subsequent risk of COVID-19 leading to hospitalisation, critical care admission or death. While relative risk is often reported as a measure of individual danger, absolute risk is more important and dynamic, particularly in the healthcare setting. Individual risk interacts with exposure and environmental risk-factors, and the extent of mitigation to determine overall risk. Hospitals are a unique environment in which there is a significantly increased risk of infection for all healthcare workers. Anaesthetists and intensivists particularly are at high risk of exposure to SARS-CoV-2 infected patients due to their working environments and exposure to certain patient groups. However, the available evidence suggests that the risk for this group of individuals is not currently increased. This review examines factors associated with increased risk of infection with SARS-CoV-2, increasing severity of COVID-19 and death. A risk tool is proposed that includes personal, environmental and mitigating factors, and enables an individualised dynamic 'point-of-time' risk assessment.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2020

Contained In:

Anaesthesia - Vol. 75, No. 11 (2020), p. 1494-1508

Language:

English

Contributors:

Cook, T M

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

*Anesthetists
*Betacoronavirus
*Intensive Care Units
Adult
Aged
COVID-19
Comorbidity
Coronavirus Infections
Female
Health Personnel
Healthcare worker
Humans
Intensive care
Journal Article
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
Occupational Exposure
Pandemic
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral
Review
Risk
Risk Assessment

Notes:

Date Completed 03.11.2020

Date Revised 03.11.2020

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1111/anae.15220

PMID:

32677708

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM313460027