Cardiovascular Complications of COVID-19 : Pharmacotherapy Perspective

Coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19), which is caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is spreading rapidly the world over. The disease was declared "pandemic" by the World Health Organization. An approved therapy for patients with COVID-19 has yet to emerge; however, there are some medications used in the treatment of SARS-CoV-2 infection globally including hydroxychloroquine, remdesivir, dexamethasone, protease inhibitors, and anti-inflammatory agents. Patients with underlying cardiovascular disease are at increased risk of mortality and morbidity from COVID-19. Moreover, patients with chronic stable states and even otherwise healthy individuals might sustain acute cardiovascular problems due to COVID-19 infection. This article seeks to review the latest evidence with a view to explaining possible pharmacotherapies for the cardiovascular complications of COVID-19 including acute coronary syndrome, heart failure, myocarditis, arrhythmias, and venous thromboembolism, as well as possible interactions between these medications and those currently administered (or under evaluation) in the treatment of COVID-19.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2021

Contained In:

Cardiovascular drugs and therapy - Vol. 35, No. 2 (2021), p. 249-259

Language:

English

Contributors:

Talasaz, Azita Hajhossein
Kakavand, Hessam
Van Tassell, Benjamin
Aghakouchakzadeh, Maryam
Sadeghipour, Parham
Dunn, Steven
Geraiely, Babak

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

*Antiviral Agents
*Cardiovascular Diseases
Antiviral Agents
COVID-19
Cardiovascular
Comorbidity
Drug–drug interactions
Humans
Journal Article
Pharmacotherapy
Prognosis
Review
Risk Assessment
SARS-CoV-2
SARS-Cov2
Venous thromboembolism

Notes:

Date Completed 06.04.2021

Date Revised 06.04.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1007/s10557-020-07037-2

PMID:

32671601

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM313398801