Fast SARS-CoV-2 detection by RT-qPCR in preheated nasopharyngeal swab samples

Copyright © 2020 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved..

OBJECTIVES: The gold-standard COVID-19 diagnosis relies on detecting SARS-CoV-2 using RNA purification and one-step retrotranscription and quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Based on the urgent need for high-throughput screening, we tested the performance of three alternative, simple and affordable protocols to rapidly detect SARS-CoV-2, bypassing the long and tedious RNA extraction step and reducing the time to viral detection.

METHODS: We evaluated three methods based on direct nasopharyngeal swab viral transmission medium (VTM) heating before the RT-qPCR: a) direct without additives; b) in a formamide-EDTA (FAE) buffer, c) in a RNAsnapTM buffer.

RESULTS: Although with a delay in cycle threshold compared to the gold-standard, we found consistent results in nasopharyngeal swab samples that were subject to a direct 70°C incubation for 10 min.

CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide valuable options to overcome any supply chain issue and help to increase the throughput of diagnostic tests, thereby complementing standard diagnosis.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2020

Contained In:

International journal of infectious diseases : IJID : official publication of the International Society for Infectious Diseases - Vol. 97 (2020), p. 66-68

Language:

English

Contributors:

Alcoba-Florez, Julia
González-Montelongo, Rafaela
Íñigo-Campos, Antonio
de Artola, Diego García-Martínez
Gil-Campesino, Helena
The Microbiology Technical Support Team
Ciuffreda, Laura
Valenzuela-Fernández, Agustín
Flores, Carlos

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections
Diagnosis
Diagnostic Tests, Routine
Fast protocols
Hot Temperature
Humans
Journal Article
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral
RNA extraction
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
SARS-CoV-2
Sample treatment

Notes:

Date Completed 03.08.2020

Date Revised 27.01.2021

published: Print-Electronic

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1016/j.ijid.2020.05.099

PMID:

32492531

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM311615589