Right Mini-thoracotomy Bentall Procedure

OBJECTIVE: Bentall procedures are traditionally performed through a median sternotomy. The right mini-thoracotomy approach is increasingly used in aortic valve replacement. This approach has been shown to have decreased blood loss and hospital length of stay compared with sternotomy. A right mini-thoracotomy approach may also be beneficial in selected patients requiring aortic root surgery. We present our initial clinical experience of patients who have undergone a right mini-thoracotomy Bentall.

METHODS: This is a single-center retrospective review of seven patients who underwent a primary elective right anterior mini-thoracotomy Bentall. A thoracoscope was used in each case. Automated suturing technology was used for annular suturing in three of the seven patients. Clinical outcomes evaluated include 30-day mortality, intensive care and hospital length of stay, time to extubation, operative times, as well as postoperative sequelae including stroke, infection, and bleeding.

RESULTS: Median cardiopulmonary bypass, cross-clamp, and circulatory arrest time were 217, 153, and 28 minutes, respectively. Median time to extubation was 10 hours and median intensive care unit and hospital stay was 1 and 4 days, respectively. One patient had a wound infection and one returned to the operating room for bleeding. There were no in-hospital or 30-day mortalities.

CONCLUSIONS: The Bentall procedure can be performed through a right anterior mini-thoracotomy in selected patients with excellent clinical results.

Media Type:

Electronic Article

Year of Publication:

2018

Contained In:

Innovations (Philadelphia, Pa.) - Vol. 13, No. 5 (2018), p. 328-331

Language:

English

Contributors:

Johnson, Carl A
Siordia, Juan A
Wood, Katherine L
Robinson, Davida A
Knight, Peter A

Links:

Volltext

Keywords:

Aorta
Female
Humans
Journal Article
Male
Middle Aged
Minimally Invasive Surgical Procedures
Morbidity
Operative Time
Retrospective Studies
Thoracotomy

Notes:

Date Completed 11.03.2019

Date Revised 11.03.2019

published: Print

Citation Status MEDLINE

Copyright: From MEDLINE®/PubMed®, a database of the U.S. National Library of Medicine

Physical Description:

Online-Ressource

doi:

10.1097/IMI.0000000000000555

PMID:

30407927

PPN (Catalogue-ID):

NLM290844614